Mstislav Rostropovich

MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH

Rostropovich
Int. Release 06 Feb. 2012
5 CDs / Download


Track Liste

CD 1: Mstislav Rostropovich - The Decca Recordings

Franz Schubert (1797 - 1828)
Sonata for Arpeggione and Piano in A Minor, D. 821

2.
4:35

3.
10:30

Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856)
5 Stücke Im Volkston, Op.102

5.
3:30

Mstislav Rostropovich, Benjamin Britten

Franz Joseph Haydn (1732 - 1809)
Cello Concerto In C Major, Hob. VIIb:1

9.
9:47

10.
9:33

Mstislav Rostropovich, English Chamber Orchestra, Benjamin Britten

Gesamtspielzeit: 1:12:47

CD 2: Mstislav Rostropovich - The Decca Recordings

Benjamin Britten (1913 - 1976)
Suite For Cello No.1, Op.72

Suite For Cello No.2, Op.80

10.
4:29

11.
4:37

13.
5:25

Mstislav Rostropovich

Sonata In C For Cello And Piano Op.65

15.
6:52

17.
5:59

18.
2:09

19.
2:38

Mstislav Rostropovich, Benjamin Britten

Gesamtspielzeit: 1:07:58

CD 3: Mstislav Rostropovich - The Decca Recordings

Benjamin Britten (1913 - 1976)
Symphony For Cello And Orchestra, Op.68

1.
12:32

2.
3:41

3.
10:34

4.
7:24

Mstislav Rostropovich, English Chamber Orchestra, Benjamin Britten

Frank Bridge (1879 - 1941)
Sonata For Cello And Piano

Claude Debussy (1862 - 1918)
Sonata In D Minor For Cello & Piano, L.135

Mstislav Rostropovich, Benjamin Britten

Gesamtspielzeit: 1:09:52

CD 4: Mstislav Rostropovich - The Decca Recordings

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
Sonata For Cello And Piano No.1 In F, Op.5 No.1

Sonata For Cello And Piano No.4 In C, Op.102 No.1

Sonata For Cello And Piano No.5 In D, Op.102 No.2

Mstislav Rostropovich, Sviatoslav Richter

Gesamtspielzeit: 55:32

CD 5: Mstislav Rostropovich - The Decca Recordings

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770 - 1827)
Sonata For Cello And Piano No.2 In G Minor, Op.5 No.2

Sonata For Cello And Piano No.3 In A, Op.69

Mstislav Rostropovich, Sviatoslav Richter

Gesamtspielzeit: 53:06

. . . [Rostropovich's] Decca tapings are here handsomely collected and involve other stellar musicians . . . wonderful gutsy accounts of Beethoven's five cello sonatas . . . [Haydn: Cello Concerto no. 1]: a spirited performance . . . These marvelous interpretations are her given a new lease of life.

. . . the performances conquer all . . . [Schubert] the players' convictions are so beautifully realised that one might think the composer had asked for exactly what is played. This is the principal interpretative quirk in an account of beauty and poise . . . [Haydn Cello Concerto] a similar delight . . . [Britten's chamber works for cello]: Most pertinently the performers bring out the sense of concentrated economy becoming evident in Britten's writing then, his new-found brevity focussing his melodic development . . . [Britten]: Rostropovich shows beyond doubt the technical knowledge of Britten the composer for strings -- he was after all a highly competent viola player . . . an ideal recording . . . so persuasive is the cellist that it is difficult to imagine a better approach; the intensity is almost overwhelming, Britten taking the cello to previously unknown capabilities . . . [Britten/Cello Symphony]: The ferocity of the cello-playing is striking . . . matched by the ECO, here augmented to symphony-orchestra size . . . all are examples of Britten the conductor getting an orchestra to play on the edge of the musicians' collective seats . . . [Bridge]: The strength of feeling in this rendition is once again white-hot, and though it may take a few hearings to grasp the breadth and depth of this piece the investment is well worth it. Towards the climax of the second movement in particular, Rostropovich keeps a seamless line that moves upwards without flinching, commanding the execution of the longer phrase until he reaches the highest note. Britten is his equal in terms of assertiveness, although the two make the moments of repose stand out too. It is difficult to imagine a better performance of the Debussy . . . [Beethoven sonatas with Sviatoslav Richter]: There is a lot of joy in this music, both performers intent on capturing Beethoven's spirit of discovery as he bends new forms . . . Richter's virtuosity is often breathtaking . . . an essential document for cello students, with much vivid chemistry between Rostropovich, a simply wonderful musician and inspirational character, and Britten (it's very instructive to be reminded of his artistry) and with Richter.