FREIRE - RADIO DAYS Concerto Broadcasts 1968-79

Share

NELSON FREIRE
RADIO DAYS

The Concerto Broadcasts 1968 - 1979

Tchaikovsky 1
Rachmaninov 3
Prokofiev 1
Chopin 1
Liszt 2
Schumann
Int. Release 01 Sep. 2014
3 CDs / Download
0289 478 6772 2 3 CDs ADD DX3


Track List

CD 1: Nelson Freire Radio Days - The Concerto Broadcasts 1968-1979

Frédéric Chopin (1810 - 1849)
Piano Concerto No.1 In E Minor, Op.11

Nelson Freire, NDR-Sinfonieorchester, Heinz Wallberg

Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856)
Nelson Freire, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Reinhard Peters

Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893)
Piano Concerto No.1 In B Flat Minor, Op.23

Nelson Freire, Orchestre Philharmonique De L'ORTF, Kurt Masur

Total Playing Time: 1:22:48

CD 2: Nelson Freire Radio Days - The Concerto Broadcasts 1968-1979

Sergei Prokofiev (1891 - 1953)
Piano Concerto No.1 in D flat, Op.10

Nelson Freire, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Yuri Ahronovitch

Franz Liszt (1811 - 1886)
Piano Concerto No.2 in A, S.125

Nelson Freire, Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Eleazar de Carvalho

Sergey Vasil'yevich Rachmaninov (1873 - 1943)
Piano Concerto No.3 in D minor, Op.30

Nelson Freire, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra, David Zinman

Total Playing Time: 1:16:12

Nelson Freire is . . . one of the great pianists of our age . . . There's not a dud among them. Each bar is full of the vitality that Freire brings to everything he plays . . . Freire's fabulously clean phrasing and pearly tone are never compromised, and each concerto is special in one way or another. A few do stand out. In the Tchaikovsky, with Kurt Masur and the ORTF Philharmonic from 1969, both pianist and conductor strip away anything that is remotely hackneyed about this overfamiliar war horse, so that every texture gleams. The performance is taken in a single glorious sweep, while there's astonishing lightness and poise about the solo playing in the Liszt (with the Bavarian Radio Symphony under Freire's compatriot Eleazar de Carvalho). The evenness and beauty of the scales in the slow introduction are breathtaking . . . [Rachmaninov]: Freire's account of the Third Concerto crackles with intensity . . . it's thrillingly alert to every twist and turn of the formidably challenging solo writing.

These recordings of live broadcasts dating from 1968-79 tell us in no uncertain terms of Nelson Freire's immaculate overall command, allied to a liberation granted to only the finest pianists . . . his first performance of Chopin's E minor Concerto [displays] playing of a formidable assurance. Cool and elegant in Chopin, Freire . . . offers a surprise item, his one and only performance of Schumann's Introduction and Allegro, where all awkward and unpianistic problems are resolved with ease . . . [Freire's Prokofiev First Concerto has] a haunting sense of the slow movement's achingly 'blue' idiom. Again, in Liszt's Second Concerto the nuance and colouring at, for example, 3'57" are as remarkable as Freire's final sprint to the finishing post. Finally, Rachmaninov's Third Concerto, given with all of Freire's facility and with a blast-off launch to the finale that will surprise those who think of this pianist as more sleek than impassioned . . . Decca's album is lavishly illustrated and . . . sound and balance are outstanding.