BACH Weihnachts-Oratorium Chailly

Share

JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH

Weihnachts-Oratorium
Christmas Oratorio
Martin Lattke · Carolyn Sampson
Wiebke Lehmkuhl · Wolfram Lattke
Konstantin Wolff
Dresdner Kammerchor
Gewandhaus Orchestra
Riccardo Chailly
Int. Release 01 Nov. 2010
2 CDs / Download
CD DDD 0289 478 2271 4 DH 2


Track List

CD 1: Bach, J.S.: Weihnachts Oratorium

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Christmas Oratorio, BWV 248

Part One - For the first Day of Christmas

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Part Two - For the second Day of Christmas

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Wolfram Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Part Three - For the third Day of Christmas

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Carolyn Sampson, Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Total Playing Time: 1:08:58

CD 2: Bach, J.S.: Weihnachts Oratorium

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Christmas Oratorio, BWV 248

Part Four - For New Year's Day

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Carolyn Sampson, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Wolfram Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Part Five - For the 1st Sunday in the New Year

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Carolyn Sampson, Wolfram Lattke, Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Part Six - For the Feast of Epiphany

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Carolyn Sampson, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Martin Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly, Martin Lattke

Wolfram Lattke, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Riccardo Chailly, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Wolfram Lattke

Carolyn Sampson, Wiebke Lehmkuhl, Wolfram Lattke, Konstantin Wolff, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Dresdner Kammerchor, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Riccardo Chailly

Total Playing Time: 1:03:07

With excellent soloists, led by Martin Lattke as the Evangelist, the result is a wonderfully flexible and dramatically vivid account, constantly illuminated by the obbligatos from the Gewandhaus wind, particularly the outstanding principal trumpet. Chailly manages to combine the rhythmic lightness of a period-instrument performance with the tonal richness of a traditional orchestra. It is by far the most successful of his Bach forays to date.

Hearing Chailly in Bach has been a revelation, the sort of surprise that makes reviewing a constantly renewed pleasure.

The performance channels advantages of both customs: historically informed nimbleness, the symphony orchestra's luxe warmth. The textures are transparent, but with nary a hard edge; even the quickest numbers eschew drive for swing. The Dresdner Kammerchor and an accomplished lineup of soloists (led by tenor Martin Lattke's burnished Evangelist) offer singing that's likewise both rich and agile.

Riccardo Chailly, with superb soloists and his matchless orchestra and choir, interprets it with finesse, fluency and festive élan.

[The recording of Bach Weihnachts-Oratorium] is an absolute blast. If you like fast tempi you'll love this spicy and crisp live version from conductor Riccardo Chailly, the Gewandhausorchester of Leipzig and the Dresdner Kammerchor. The whizzy speeds give the yuletide message a sense of urgency and excitement but the clarity of the complex polyphonic writing is never sacrificed. The top-drawer soloists are all of the light, fleet-of-voice variety, and the orchestral playing is wonderfully exuberant.

. . . he eschews the current trend towards period instrumentation, with no perceptible loss of authenticity. It's marvellously recorded, the solo vocalists sustaining poise and clarity against the full onslaught of choir and orchestra, while the fulsome brass brings a dazzling, burnished lustre to the performance.

[This] is probably destined to be the reference recording of the "Christmas Oratorio." Among the first-class lineup of soloists soprano Carolyn Sampson is an obvious major attraction, but Martin Lattke is also superb as the narrating Evangelist . . . Most remarkable are Chailly's tempos, which are fashionably brisk but, more important, convey a great sense of celebration appropriate to the season . . . Chailly's fresh attention to detail reveals a creative effervescence.

The Leipzig Gewandhausorchester's brilliant sound dances in Riccardo Chailly's jubilant recording of Bach's Christmas Oratorio. The choral singing is lithe from the Dresdner Kammerchor. Bass Konstantin Wolff leads a well-balanced and characterful quintet of vocal soloists, with soprano Carolyn Sampson sounding peach-sweet in her arias. Among the uniformly excellent obbligato soloists, horn players Ralf Götz and Raimund Zell and violinists Sebastian Breuninger and Peter Gerlach deserve special mention. A joy from start to finish.

For those who like their Christmas listening to be great music, not merely seasonal, I recommend the new double CD Christmas Oratorio . . . [A fine roster of soloists, led by Carolyn Sampson,] and the Dresden Chamber Choir contribute to this Christmas's most successful serious offering.

Chailly's exhilaration is irresistible . . .

His trumpets are spectacular and he brings a rare sense of drama and rediscovery to this glorious music.

. . . an intimate affair featuring crystal-clear soloists, a lean but tender chorus and an agile, graceful orchestra.

. . . [the soloists] are an admirable lot, and their contributions benefit considerably from the relative calm . . . [the Gewandhaus orchestra's] splendid playing reflects the confidence that accrues from familiarity. The trumpets, especially, thrill . . . Overall, Chailly's performance comes close . . . There is drama, to be sure . . .

Riccardo Chailly's Bach from the Gewandhaus espouses the 'Third Way', as Chailly calls it, where romantic and 'period' style find a happy synergy. For many it will satisfy beyond measure. The orchestral playing is supremely polished, assured and with pinpoint nuancing. The Dresden Kammerchor and vocal soloists fulfil Chailly's ambition for unremitting leanness and breathtaking mobility . . . I savoured 'Frohe Hirten' as rarely before -- the agile tenor Wolfram Lattke is so completely allied with his fluting partner that the shepherds almost take off in exaltation. Carolyn Sampson is irresistible throughout.

In diesem Weihnachtsoratorium regieren die Klarheit und die Zartheit, entfaltet sich die Pracht im Inneren . . . Hier fügen die Details sich zum Ganzen, brodelt es innerlich, beherrscht ein ganz anderer Klang das Geschehen . . . Barockkultur vom Feinsten . . . [Martin Lattke, Tenor]: Tongebung, Artikulation und Geschmeidigkeit [rasten ein] und seine leicht, sicher, schlicht und menschlich geführte Schilderung der Heilsgeschichte greift nach der Seele . . . [Wolfram Lattke, Tenor]: Seine virtuose Hirten-Arie ist auf Welt-Niveau unterwegs. Mit sinnlicher Selbstverständlichkeit perlen die Koloraturen, nichts ist davon zu merken, wie schwer diese Arie ist . . . Carolyn Sampson führt einen schlackenlos prägnanten Sopran mit wunderbar eigenem Timbre . . . Wiebke Lehmkuhl entwickelt bei aller Klarheit weibliche Kraft . . . Das Ganze ist unter den zärtlich formenden Händen Chaillys noch weit mehr als die Summe seiner schönen Teile.

. . . [Pastorale]: So drahtig, lebendig und immer wieder neu legt Chailly den [Satz an] . . . wer den Mut hat, immer wieder Neues zu entdecken in Bachs unermesslichem Kosmos, der ist bei Chaillys unerbittlicher Transparenz [gut aufgehoben] . . . [der Live-Mitschnitt] klingt ausgezeichnet. Aber die Natürlichkeit der Klangfarben, die Detailflut, der Raum . . . sind rundweg atemberaubend.

. . . in tänzerisch schneller Beweglichkeit betreibt das Gewandhausorchester virtuose Musizierakrobatik, die Chorstimmen weben sich bezaubernd und sicher mit tupfend spielerischen Akzenten umeinander, die Solisten prägen charakterstark und markant ihre Arien. Diese Freude der Weihnacht ist ansteckend ¿ ein "Weihnachtsoratorium", bei dem man die unsterblichen Melodien mitpfeift.

Exemplarisch macht der Maestro mit seinem erstklassigen Orchester, guten Solisten und dem Dresdner Kammerchor deutlich, wie man auf modernen Instrumenten all den Glanz und die Durchsichtigkeit des barocken Musikverständnisses erreichen kann. Mit einem wunderschön bewegten Puls bringt Chailly Licht und Freude in das Weihnachtsoratorium, dirigiert Musik, die zum Himmel strebt und doch Menschen berührt.

. . . so hat man das noch nie gehört . . . So artikuliert, durchsichtig, vibratoarm in Streichern wie Bläsern, so an Rhetorik und Gestik, Affekt und Wortausdeutung orientiert konnte man das Leipziger Gewandhausorchester zuletzt wohl nur im 18. Jahrhundert hören. Allerdings schwerlich so virtuos . . . Chailly hätte keinen kompetenteren Partner finden können als den Dresdner Kammerchor, eines der besten Vokalensembles für barocke Musik. Bei diesen Sängern klingt Kontrapunktik, als seien Chorfugen etwas sehr Natürliches. Der Engeljubel in "Ehre sei Gott" führt in einen Himmel voll menschlicher Leidenschaft. Man könnte tanzen zu diesem Drive, diesen Akzenten, dem Ausdruck in der silbengenauen Diktion . . . Die "stolzen Feinde" schnauben nicht, sie sind nur elegant hingetuscht, und anders als zu Beginn klingen die Ventiltrompeten eitel und geölt. Die Solisten sind eine Wonne . . . Martin Lattke ist ein sensibler Evangelist, sein Bruder Wolfram singt die Tenorkoloraturen in "Frohe Hirten" mit unglaublicher Leichtigkeit. Wenn Sopranistin Carolyn Sampson mit ihrer schlanken Stimme ein Wort wie "falsch" scheel anschärft, ahnt man den Dramatiker Bach. Altistin Wiebke Lehmkuhl verschmilzt in "Schließe, mein Herze" mit der Violine wie der Mensch mit dem Himmel. Und Riccardo Chailly sorgt, darin eben doch an Romantik geschulter Sinfoniker, für einen himmelweiten Bogen: Man will alle Kantaten an einem Stück hören. Ist unhistorisch, macht aber Freude.

Zweifelsohne hat sich Chailly "kundig" gemacht. Das verkleinerte Gewandhausorchester überzeugt durch geschliffenen Klang, der Dresdner Kammerchor empfiehlt sich durch Geschlossenheit.


Insights

english | french | german

“Death, Devil, Sin and Hell" Bach's Christmas Oratorio and its Genesis

In marked contrast to his London-based contemporary George Frideric Handel, Johann Sebastian Bach composed only a few oratorios. He took up the genre only after his production of cantatas was largely completed. As recently discovered sources indicate, after 1730 Bach increasingly performed sacred cantatas by his contemporaries, but only occasionally wrote his own works for the church. The time he saved was devoted by the Thomaskantor to preparing and performing especially ambitious compositions. These include his Christmas Oratorio (1734-5) and Ascension Oratorio (1735), as well as the revised (1736) version of the St Matthew Passion, a work with double chorus for which Bach, in his fair copy of the score, notated the Evangelist's part in red ink. Clearly he regarded the original Biblical text as timeless and enduring - in contrast to the many passages of free madrigalistic poetry, whose transitory quality he must already have recognised. It is uncertain whether Bach composed only the three oratorios (for Christmas, Easter and Ascension Day) that have come down to us or if other works of this type disappeared shortly after his death. In an obituary dating from the end of 1750, Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach refers to his father's “many oratorios", but it remains unclear which compositions Bach's second-eldest son may have meant.
Bach's oratorios are based on self-contained Biblical narratives and occupy the same position in the service as the sacred cantatas: their textual basis is also the Gospel for the respective Sunday or feast day. The Christmas Oratorio was composed for the services between Christmas Day and Epiphany. Bach accordingly divided it into six parts, each associated with one of the Sundays or feast days during Christmastide, but always with an overall plan in mind. That much is clear from Parts I, III and VI, which form the oratorio's framework. In terms of layout, key and scoring, they are part of a unified conception, and it is surely no coincidence that the oratorio's first and last chorales are both based on the melody “O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden". The twofold appearance of this passion chorale is evidence of the deliberate thematic link between Parts I and VI, but it also indicates that Bach, in the narration of Christ's birth, is already drawing attention to his Passion.
As was often the case on high feasts (and, in particular, the first three days of Christmas, New Year's Day and Epiphany), Bach's time was limited as a result of the holidays' close succession and the number of performances needing to be provided with music. Therefore instead of borrowing the choruses, arias and recitatives for the last part of the oratorio from his secular congratulatory cantatas, Bach deviated from his original parody plan and, as a time-saving measure, turned to one of his church cantatas (BWV 248a). The composition in question, which survives only as a fragment, was composed a few months earlier and apparently was intended for Michaelmas (29 September) 1734. It is fascinating to discover how text fragments from the parody model's cantata libretto found their way into Part VI of the oratorio, the opening chorus of which refers to the “raging" fiend that uses its “sharp talons" for destruction. Little imagination is needed to connect the “raging fiend's sharp claws" with the cantata's “raging dragon". Similarly, the text passage “Tod, Teufel, Sünd und Hölle sind ganz und gar geschwächt" (“Death, devil, sin and hell are utterly diminished"; movement 64) must also have come, intact or modified, from the Michaelmas cantata: the archangel Michael's victory over the Dragon has vanquished the powers of darkness. The “raging monster" in Part VI of the oratorio represents King Herod, who is not defeated with the sword but rather outwitted at God's command by the Wise Men from the East.
Also deviating from Bach's initial parody plan, some of the oratorio is newly composed, including the alto aria “Schliesse, mein Herze, dies selige Wunder" (movement 31). Bach set this text with extraordinary dedication: his first compositional sketch remained a fragment, apparently because his original scoring (for alto, two flutes, strings and continuo) seemed ostentatious coming directly after the Biblical text “Maria aber behielt alle diese Worte und bewegte sie in ihrem Herzen" (“Mary kept all these things and pondered them in her heart"). He therefore completely revised it for solo violin, alto and continuo. This exceptionally inward, deeply felt tone-poem is (like all the other alto solos) conceived for the Virgin Mary. The great care Bach invested in this “centrepiece" of his oratorio shows that he regarded his work for Christmas as anything but a routine project, however much that might be suggested by his repeated recycling of earlier occasional music. Whereas most of the choruses and arias are borrowings from existing pieces, the chorale settings and recitatives were largely newly composed. Bach paid special attention to the chorales: Part IV contains no fewer than three of his own melodies (“Jesu, du mein liebstes Leben", “Jesu, meine Freud und Wonne" and “Jesus richte mein Beginnen") that can be found in none of his other works.
The period in which Bach composed the Christmas Oratorio is precisely documented. Both the autograph score and the original printed libretto are dated 1734. The individual performances spanned the period from Christmas Day of 1734 to Epiphany of 1735. Whether and how often the work was revived in later years, however, is unknown. Its librettist was presumably the Leipzig civil servant and successful author of occasional verse Christian Friedrich Henrici (known under his pseudonym Picander), who had written the texts of the secular congratulatory and homage works already mentioned as sources of the oratorio. Bach himself undoubtedly took a decisive role in shaping the libretto - not just in the choice of texts for the choruses and arias, but also the Biblical passages and chorale stanzas. It was therefore essential for him to collaborate directly with his poet, since the new oratorio texts needed to be adapted to the music being reused.
The characteristic musical language of the oratorio is one of easily singable melodies; indeed the melodic expression in some arias already seems to be approaching the mid-18th century musical aesthetic of “Empfindsamkeit", marked by intimacy and subjectivity. Often the upper part dominates, as the melodic element assumes precedence over polyphony. Strict counterpoint is often relaxed by means of concertante instrumental figuration. Perhaps this new feature in Bach's music, beginning to show itself around 1730, is one reason for the oratorio's great popularity today.
In his scoring, Bach has given each part of the oratorio its own instrumental profile, and thus the respective scenes are already illustrated for the listener through their characteristic sonorities. This is most conspicuous in the instrumental Sinfonia that begins Part II. The musicologist, organist and physician Albert Schweitzer interpreted this piece as an antiphonal dialogue between angels (strings and flutes) and shepherds (oboes). In Parts I, III and VI - the work's cornerstones - trumpets and timpani, the royal instruments of the 17th and 18th centuries, symbolize the power of the newborn son of God, who has appeared to mankind on earth to redeem them and reconcile them with his Heavenly Father.

***
After Bach's death, the Christmas Oratorio came into the possession of his second-eldest son, Carl Philipp Emanuel, in Berlin. In later years, he made use of a single movement from the work, the opening chorus “Jauchzet, frohlocket": with text unaltered but lightly modified instrumental scoring, he placed it at the beginning of the Easter music he performed in Hamburg in 1778. There was apparently no opportunity in that city for a performance of his father's Christmas work.
Unlike J.S. Bach's Matthew and John Passions as well as some of his cantatas and masses, the Christmas Oratorio was not heard again after 1800 for a relatively long time. The first documented public performance - although only the first two parts - took place on 20 December 1844 with the Breslau Singakademie under its enterprising director Johann Theodor Mosewius. Further performances followed in 1845, 1847 and 1848, again in Breslau. At this time the work was still unpublished. The oratorio's first performance by the Berlin Singakademie came in 1857, when the work's technical demands (especially on the singers) led the choir's director, Eduard Grell, to transpose it down a semitone (to D flat). He also cut the work drastically, as was customary in the performance practice of that time. Whether there was “sufficient interest on the part of the public" for a complete presentation - as the Singakademie's director hoped the future would eventually bring - remains doubtful: enthusiasm for Bach in Berlin was still limited.
The Christmas Oratorio was not performed again at the Leipzig Gewandhaus until 1922, although individual movements were given in Gewandhaus concerts conducted by the Kapellmeister Carl Reinecke, including the “Shepherds' Sinfonia" (1862 and 1870), the opening chorus “Jauchzet, frohlocket" (1861) and the second part of the chorale “Wir singen dir in deinem Heer" (1862). On 20 December, Parts I-III were heard for the first time, but a complete performance had to wait until 13 and 14 December 1958.
The present complete recording is based on acclaimed performances given in the Gewandhaus on 7 and 8 January 2010, part of an ongoing Bach cycle that began with the six Brandenburg Concertos in 2007, followed by the St Matthew Passion in 2009, the keyboard concertos with pianist Ramin Bahrami in 2009 and 2010, and the St John Passion in 2010. The next instalment in the cycle, the Mass in B minor, is planned for 2014.
Andreas Glöckner
8/2010

»Tod, Teufel, Sünd und Hölle« Bachs Weihnachts-Oratorium und seine Entstehungsgeschichte

Ganz im Gegensatz zu seinem Londoner Zeitgenossen Georg Friedrich Händel hat Johann Sebastian Bach nur wenige Oratorien geschaffen. Er beschäftigte sich mit jener Gattung erst zu einer Zeit, als sein Kantatenschaffen weitgehend abgeschlossen war. Wie neueste Quellenfunde belegen, hat Bach nach 1730 in verstärktem Maße geistliche Kantaten seiner Zeitgenossen aufgeführt, hingegen eigene Kirchenwerke nur noch vereinzelt geschaffen. Den dadurch gewonnenen Freiraum nutzte der Thomaskantor zur Vorbereitung und Aufführung besonders ambitionierter Kompositionen. Hierzu gehörten u.a. sein Weihnachts-Oratorium (1734/1735), das Himmelfahrts-Oratorium (1735) oder die revidierte Fassung der doppelchörigen Matthäus-Passion (1736), in deren Schönschriftpartitur er den Evangelienbericht sogar mit roter Tinte eintrug. Offensichtlich hielt Bach den originalen Bibeltext für zeitlos und dauerhaft - im Gegensatz zu vielen freien madrigalischen Dichtungen, deren Vergänglichkeit er noch zu Lebzeiten hatte zur Kenntnis nehmen müssen. Ob Bach nur die drei uns überlieferten Oratorien (zu Weihnachten, zu Ostern und Himmelfahrt) komponierte oder ob weitere einschlägige Werke bald nach seinem Tod verloren gegangen sind, bleibt ungewiss. In einem Ende 1750 verfassten Nachruf (Nekrolog) verweist Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach zwar auf »viele Oratorien« seines Vaters, doch bleibt unklar, welche Kompositionen der zweitälteste Bach-Sohn damit gemeint haben könnte.
Bachs Oratorien basieren auf einer inhaltlich geschlossenen biblischen Handlung. Im Gottesdienst haben sie dieselbe Stellung wie die geistliche Kantate, denn ihre Textgrundlage bezieht sich ebenfalls auf das Evangelium für den jeweiligen Sonn- oder Festtag. Das Weihnachts-Oratorium entstand für die Gottesdienste vom 1. Weihnachtsfeiertag bis zum Epiphaniasfest. Bach gliederte es demgemäß in sechs Teile, die jeweils einem Sonn- oder Festtag in der Weihnachtszeit zugeordnet sind. Dabei hatte er stets das Gesamtkonzept im Blick. Dies offenbaren namentlich die Teile I, III und VI, welche den Rahmen des Werkes bilden. Hinsichtlich ihrer Anlage, ihrer Tonart und Instrumentierung sind sie von Bach einheitlich konzipiert - und gewiss nicht zufällig basieren der erste und letzte Choral des Oratoriums auf der Melodie »O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden«. Die zweimalige Verwendung dieses Passionsliedes weist auf die beabsichtigte thematische Verklammerung der Teile I und VI, lässt sich aber auch dahingehend deuten, dass Bach beim Bericht von Christi Geburt gleichsam auch den Blick auf dessen Leidensweg habe lenken wollen.
Bach hat bei der Komposition des Oratoriums in erheblichem Maße auf weltliche Kantaten zurückgegriffen. Im wesentlichen handelt es sich dabei um Huldigungsmusiken, die von ihm erst kurze Zeit zuvor für die kursächsisch-polnische Herrscherfamilie komponiert worden waren: »Laßt uns sorgen, laßt uns wachen« (BWV 213) zum Geburtstag des sächsischen Kurprinzen Friedrich Christian (am 2.September 1733), »Tönet, ihr Pauken! Erschallet, Trompeten!« (BWV 214) zum Geburtstag der sächsischen Kurfürstin Maria Josepha (am 8.Dezember 1733) und »Preise dein Glücke, gesegnetes Sachsen« zum Jahrestag der Königswahl August III. (am 5.Oktober 1734). Vielleicht wurden jene Kantaten sogar in der Absicht komponiert, sie in einem späteren Werk wieder verwenden zu können. Beim Umgestalten der einzelnen Sätze (beziehungsweise bei ihrer Anpassung an den neuen Text) ging Bach mit besonderer Umsicht vor. Dabei wurde das weihnachtliche Werk gegenüber den weltlichen Vorlagen sogar aufgewertet, indem einige der überarbeiteten Sätze eine substantielle Bereicherung erfahren haben. Bach hat sie farbiger und opulenter instrumentiert, musikalisch im Detail noch weiter ausgefeilt.
Wie oft zu hohen Kirchenfesten (und namentlich an den drei Weihnachtstagen, zu Neujahr und Epiphanias) drängte die Zeit infolge der kurz aufeinander folgenden Feiertage und der Vielzahl der dafür zu besorgenden Aufführungen. Daher hat Bach - abweichend vom ursprünglichen Parodiekonzept - die Chöre, Arien und Rezitative für den letzten Oratorienteil nicht einer seiner weltlichen Huldigungsmusiken entnommen, sondern einer Kirchenkantate (BWV 248a) entlehnt. Ein solches Übernahmeverfahren erwies sich zweifellos als weniger zeitaufwändig. Die nur fragmentarisch überlieferte Komposition entstand wenige Monate zuvor und war offenbar für das Michaelisfest (29. September) 1734 bestimmt. Interessanterweise lassen sich im VI. Teil des Oratoriums noch Textbruchstücke vom Kantatenlibretto der Parodievorlage entdecken: So ist im Eingangschor die Rede vom »schnaubenden« Feind, der seine »scharfen Klauen« zum Verderben anderer zu gebrauchen weiß. Ohne viel Fantasie aufbringen zu müssen, sind die »scharfen Klauen des Feindes« am ehesten dem »schnaubenden« Drachen zuzuordnen. Ebenso dürfte die Textstelle »Tod, Teufel, Sünd und Hölle sind ganz und gar geschwächt« (Satz 64) in gleicher oder abgewandelter Lesart jener Michaeliskantate entstammen: Durch den Sieg des Erzengels Michael über den Drachen sind die Mächte der Finsternis in ihre Schranken gewiesen. Die Rolle des »schnaubenden Ungeheuers« ist im VI. Teil des Oratoriums dem König Herodes zugedacht. Dieser wird zwar nicht mit dem Schwert besiegt, aber auf Gottes Weisung von den Weisen aus dem Morgenlande überlistet.
Abweichend von Bachs anfänglichem Parodieplan sind einige Sätze des Oratoriums neu geschaffen worden; darunter die anrührende Alt-Arie »Schließe, mein Herze, dies selige Wunder« (Satz 31). Gerade diesen Text hat Bach mit besonderer Hingabe vertont: Sein erster Kompositionsentwurf blieb Fragment, denn offenbar schien ihm die zunächst gewählte Besetzung (für Alt, zwei Traversflöten, Streicher und Basso continuo) im unmittelbaren Anschluss an die Bibelstelle »Maria aber behielt alle diese Worte und bewegte sie in ihrem Herzen« als zu pompös. Der Satz wurde daher für Solo-Violine, Alt und Continuo völlig neu gestaltet. Die überaus innige Tondichtung ist (wie alle anderen solistischen Alt-Partien) der Mutter Maria zugedacht. Am »Herzstück« seines Oratoriums hat Bach offenbar sehr sorgfältig gefeilt und dies zeigt, dass das weihnachtliche Werk für ihn keineswegs eine Routinearbeit war, selbst wenn die gehäufte Wiederverwendung älterer Gelegenheitsmusiken dies vielleicht vermuten ließe. Während die meisten Chöre und Arien des Oratoriums aus bereits vorhandenen Kompositionen entlehnt sind, komponierte Bach die Choralsätze und Rezitative im wesentlichen neu. Den Chorälen galt dabei sein besonderes Augenmerk; im IV. Teil überrascht Bach sogar mit drei eigenen Melodieschöpfungen (»Jesu, du mein liebstes Leben«, »Jesu, meine Freud und Wonne« und »Jesus richte mein Beginnen«), die in keinem anderen seiner Werke nachzuweisen sind.
Die Entstehungszeit des Weihnachts-Oratoriums ist genauestens dokumentiert: Sowohl die autographe Partitur als auch der Originaltextdruck sind auf das Jahr 1734 datiert. Die einzelnen Aufführungen erstreckten sich demzufolge über den Zeitraum vom 1.Weihnachtsfeiertag 1734 bis zum Epiphaniasfest 1735. Ob und wie oft das Werk in späteren Jahren wieder aufgeführt worden ist, entzieht sich allerdings unserer Kenntnis. Als dessen Textdichter wurde der Leipziger Oberpostkommissar und Steuereinnehmer Christian Friedrich Henrici (genannt Picander) vermutet, denn immerhin hatte der erfolgreiche Leipziger Gelegenheitspoet bereits die Libretti für die schon erwähnten weltlichen Huldigungsmusiken verfasst. Zweifelsfrei aber nahm Bach maßgeblichen Einfluss auf die Gestaltung des Librettos nicht allein auf die Wahl der Texte für die Chöre und Arien, sondern auch auf Bibelwort und Choralstrophen. Ein unmittelbares Zusammenwirken mit seinem Dichter war schon deshalb unerlässlich, da der neue Oratorientext der wieder verwendeten Musik angepasst werden musste.
Charakteristisch für die Tonsprache im Oratorium ist eine Tendenz zu liedhafter, leicht fasslicher Melodik - und es erweckt den Anschein, als würde sich der melodische Ausdruck in einigen Arien bereits der Geisteshaltung der »Empfindsamkeit« annähern. Häufig dominiert die Oberstimme; das Melodische hat Vorrang, die Polyphonie tritt zuweilen in den Hintergrund. Die kontrapunktische Strenge wird häufig durch konzertante Instrumentalfiguren aufgelockert. Vielleicht ist dieser sich um 1730 anbahnende neue Wesenszug in der Musik Bachs einer der Gründe für die heutige Beliebtheit des Oratoriums.
Bach hat die einzelnen Teile seines Oratoriums in charakteristischer Weise instrumentiert. Dadurch wird dem Hörer die jeweilige Szene schon vom Klangbild her illustriert. Besonders eindrucksvoll gelingt dies in der Instrumentalsinfonia zu Beginn des II. Teils. Der Musikwissenschaftler und Arzt Albert Schweitzer hat sie als ein wechselchöriges Musizieren der Engel (Streicher und Querflöten) und Hirten (Oboen) zu deuten versucht. Trompeten und Pauken als die königlichen Instrumente des 17. und 18. Jahrhunderts stehen in den Teilen I, III und VI den Eckpfeilern des Werkes als Symbol für die Macht des neu geborenen Gottessohnes, der den Menschen auf Erden erschienen ist, sie zu erlösen und mit seinem himmlischen Vater zu versöhnen.

***
Nach Bachs Tod gelangte das Weihnachts-Oratorium in den Besitz seines zweitältesten Sohnes Carl Philipp Emanuel in Berlin. Dieser hat in späteren Jahren lediglich den Eingangschor »Jauchzet, frohlocket« daraus wieder verwendet. Mit unverändertem Text, aber leicht modifizierter Instrumentalbesetzung stellte er den Satz an den Anfang einer 1778 aufgeführten Ostermusik. Für eine Aufführung des weihnachtlichen Werkes ergab sich in Hamburg offenbar keine Gelegenheit.
Im Unterschied zu Johann Sebastian Bachs Passionen nach Matthäus und Johannes sowie einigen seiner Kantaten und Messen ist das Weihnachts-Oratorium nach 1800 über einen relativ langen Zeitraum nicht wieder musiziert worden. Die erste nachweisbare öffentliche Aufführung erfolgte am 20. Dezember 1844 mit der Breslauer Singakademie unter ihrem verdienstvollen Leiter Johann Theodor Mosewius. Allerdings erklangen dabei nur die Teile I und II. Weitere Aufführungen folgten in den Jahren 1845, 1847 und 1848 ebenfalls in Breslau. Zu dieser Zeit war das Werk immer noch ungedruckt. Zu einer ersten Aufführung durch die Berliner Sing-Akademie kam es im Jahre 1857 unter der Leitung von Eduard Grell. Mit Rücksicht auf die enormen technischen Anforderungen (vor allem für die Sänger) erklang das Werk allerdings einen Halbton tiefer (in Des-Dur). Dass bei dieser Aufführung radikale Kürzungen vorgenommen wurden, entsprach den aufführungspraktischen Gepflogenheiten jener Zeit. Ob sich »ein ausreichendes Interesse von Seiten des Publikums« für eine vollständige Darbietung hätte finden lassen - wie es der Leiter der Sing-Akademie für spätere Zeiten erhoffte - bleibt fraglich, denn noch immer hielt sich die Bach-Begeisterung der Berliner in Grenzen.
Im Gewandhaus zu Leipzig ist das Weihnachts-Oratorium bis zum Jahre 1922 nicht aufgeführt worden. Unter der Leitung des Gewandhaus-Kapellmeisters Carl Reinecke wurden immerhin Einzelsätze musiziert; darunter die Hirtensinfonia (1862 und 1870), der Eingangschor »Jauchzet, frohlocket!« (1861) und aus dem II. Teil der Choral »Wir singen dir in deinem Heer« (1862). Am 20. Dezember 1923 erklangen erstmals die Teile I bis III; eine vollständige Aufführung erfolgte erst am 13. und 14. Dezember 1958.
Die vorliegende komplette Einspielung basiert auf den erfolgreichen Aufführungen am 7.und 8. Januar 2010 im Gewandhaus. Sie gehört zu einem großen Bach-Zyklus, der mit der Aufführung der sechs Brandenburgischen Konzerte im Jahre 2007 begonnen wurde. Es folgten 2009 die Matthäus-Passion, 2009 und 2010 die Klavierkonzerte mit dem Pianisten Ramin Bahrami sowie 2010 die Johannes-Passion. Mit der h-Moll-Messe soll im Jahre 2014 der Zyklus fortgesetzt werden.
Andreas Glöckner
8/2010

«La Mort, le Diable, le Péché et l'Enfer»L'Oratorio de Noël de Bach et sa genèse

À l'inverse de son contemporain londonien Georg Friedrich Händel, Bach ne composa que peu d'oratorios. Il aborda ce genre à une époque où sa production de cantates était pratiquement achevée. Comme l'attestent les recherches les plus récentes, Bach occupa l'essentiel de l'année 1730 à exécuter les cantates sacrées de contemporains, ne consacrant que peu de temps à la composition de ses propres œuvres liturgiques. Le cantor utilisa le temps qu'il lui restait à la préparation et à l'exécution de partitions particulièrement ambitieuses. Parmi elles, figurent l'Oratorio de Noël (1734/1735), l'Oratorio de l'Ascension (1735) et la version révisée pour double chœur de la Passion selon Saint-Matthieu (1736), dont Bach prit la peine, dans la partition mise au propre, de noter le récit évangélique à l'encre rouge. Bach tenait, de toute évidence, le texte biblique original pour intemporel et inaltérable - à l'inverse de beaucoup de poèmes madrigalesques, dont il avait eu l'occasion de percevoir le caractère éphémère. L'on ignore si Bach ne composa que les trois oratorios que nous connaissons (de Noël, de Pâques, de l'Ascension) ou s'il en écrivit d'autres qui se seraient perdus après sa mort. Si Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach fait bien référence, dans une nécrologie rédigée à la fin de l'année 1750, aux «nombreux oratorios» de son père, il est difficile de savoir à quelles compositions le fils cadet de Bach faisait ainsi allusion.
Les oratorios de Bach sont construits sur une trame biblique au contenu homogène. Ils occupent dans le service divin la même place que la cantate sacrée, car leur texte de base se réfère lui aussi à l'évangile pour le dimanche ou le jour de fête correspondant. L'Oratorio de Noël fut écrit pour les messes célébrées du premier jour de Noël à la fête de l'Épiphanie. Bach le divisa en six parties correspondant chacune à un dimanche ou à un jour de fête de la période de Noël. Bach ne perdit jamais de vue la conception d'ensemble. Cela est manifeste lorsque l'on considère les parties I, III et VI, qui constituent le cadre de l'œuvre. Au vu de leur forme, de leur tonalité et de leur instrumentation, elles sont conçues par Bach comme des entités autonomes - et ce n'est pas un hasard si les premier et dernier chorals de l'oratorio se basent sur la mélodie «O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden» (Ô front couvert de plaies et de sang). La double utilisation de ce chant de passion indique une volonté délibérée, de la part de Bach, de créer un lien thématique entre la première et la sixième, mais également d'associer au récit de la naissance du Christ une allusion à son chemin de croix.
Alors qu'il composait l'Oratorio de Noël, Bach s'inspira largement de cantates profances, essentiellement de musiques qu'il avait écrites, peu de temps auparavant, en hommage à la dynastie régnante du royaume de Saxe et de Pologne: «Laßt uns sorgen, laßt uns wachen» (BWV 213) cantate écrite pour l'anniversaire du Prince électeur de Saxe Friedrich Christian (le 2 septembre 1733), «Tönet, ihr Pauken! Erschallet, Trompeten!» (BWV 214) pour l'anniversare de la Princesse électrice de Saxe Maria Josepha (le 8 décembre 1733) et «Preise dein Glücke, gesegnetes Sachsen» pour l'annversaire de l'élection du roi Auguste III (le 5 octobre 1734). Il est même possible que Bach ait écrit ces cantates avec l'intention de les réutiliser dans une œuvre ultérieure. Lorsqu'il en remania les mouvements pour les adapter, par exemple, au nouveau texte, Bach procéda avec un soin extrême. Par rapport à ses modèles profanes, l'Oratorio de Noël offre une qualité musicale supérieure, car quelques-uns des mouvements remaniés se trouvèrent améliorés et enrichis de manière substantielle. Bach les instrumenta de manière plus colorée, plus opulente, et en affina les détails.
Comme souvent lorsqu'il s'agissait de grandes fêtes religieuses (en l'occurence les trois jours de Noël, le Nouvel an et l'Épiphanie) Bach se trouvait pressé par le temps du fait des jours de fêtes se succédant à un intervalle rapproché et du nombre important d'exécutions qu'ils exigeaient. C'est la raison pour laquelle Bach - abandonnant l'idée initiale de procéder à une parodie - tira les chœurs, airs et récitatifs, destinés à la dernière partie, non pas de l'une de ses musiques d'hommage profanes, mais d'une cantate sacrée (BWV 248a). L'utilisation d'un matériau préexistant constituait, de toute évidence, un important gain de temps. La composition, qui ne nous est parvenue que de manière fragmentaire, avait vue le jour quelques mois auparavant et était visiblement destinée à la fête de la Saint-Michel (29 septembre) 1734. Il est intéressant de noter que des bribes de textes de la cantate parodiée figurent dans la sixième partie de l'oratorio: ainsi, dans le chœur initial, il est fait mention de l'ennemi «écumant», qui blesse de ses «griffes acérées». Nul besoin de beaucoup d'imagination pour comprendre que les «griffes acérées de l'ennemi» sont celles du «dragon écumant». De même, le passage «La Mort, le Diable, le Péché et l'Enfer sont vaincus» (mouvement n° 64) apparaît de manière légèrement différente dans la cantate de la Saint-Michel: par la victoire de l'archange Saint-Michel sur le dragon, les forces des ténèbres sont chassées. Le rôle du «monstre écumant» est, dans la sixième partie de l'oratorio, tenu par le roi Hérode. Celui-ci n'est pas vaincu par le glaive, mais berné, grâce à l'intervention de Dieu, par les Rois mages venus d'orient. S'écartant du projet de parodie initial, quelques mouvements de l'oratorio furent créés de toutes pièces, notamment l'émouvant air d'alto «Schließe, mein Herze, dies selige Wunder» (mouvement n° 31). Bach s'investit énormément dans la mise en musique de ce texte: sa première tentative demeura à l'état d'ébauche, car l'effectif retenu dans un premier temps (comportant alto, deux flûtes traversières, cordes et basse continue) lui paraissait, utilisé dans le voisinage immédiat du passage biblique «Marie retint toutes ces paroles et les fit entrer dans son cœur» comme trop pompeux. Le mouvement fut, en conséquence, entièrement réécrit pour violon solo, alto et basse continue. La musique, on ne peut plus fervente, est (comme toutes les autres interventions de l'alto) associée à la Vierge Marie. Bach a, de toute évidence, particulièrement soigné le cœur névralgique de son oratorio, signe que l'œuvre n'avait pour lui rien d'un travail de routine, contrairement à ce que pourrait laisser supposer l'utilisation répétée d'anciennes pages de circonstances. Si la plupart des chœurs et des airs de l'oratorio sont empruntés à des compositions antérieures, Bach créa de toutes pièces la quasi-totalité des mouvements de choral et des récitatifs. Il attachait une importance particulière aux chorals. Dans la quatrième partie, Bach surprend même par trois mélodies qui n'apparaissent dans aucune autre de ses œuvres: («Jesu, du mein liebstes Leben», «Jesu, meine Freud und Wonne» et «Jesus richte mein Beginnen»).
La période de composition de l'Oratorio de Noël est connue avec précision: la partition autographe aussi bien que le texte imprimé original datent de 1734. Les exécutions s'échelonnèrent du premier jour de Noël 1734 à la fête de l'Épiphanie 1735. L'on ignore, en revanche, si et combien de fois l'œuvre fut donnée au cours des années suivantes. Le rédacteur du texte semble avoir eté le receveur des postes et contributions de Leipzig Christian Friedrich Henrici (plus connu sous le nom de Picander). En effet, ce poète occasionnel, très apprécié, avait déjà rédigé les textes des musiques d'hommages précédemment évoquées. Il ne fait cependant aucun doute que Bach eut son mot à dire sur la mise en forme du livret pas seulement sur le choix des textes des chœurs et des airs, mais également sur les citations de la bible et les strophes des chorals. Une collaboration étroite avec son librettiste était absolument nécessaire car le nouveau texte de l'oratorio devait convenir à la musique réutilisée.
L'une des caractéristiques du langage de l'oratorio est sa propension à privilégier un style mélodique simple - au point que l'expression mélodique de certains airs semble annoncer l'esthétique de l'Empfindsamkeit. La voix du dessus apparaît souvent prédominante. L'élément mélodique se trouve mis en avant, la polyphonie se situe parfois à l'arrière-plan, tandis que la rigueur contrapuntique est fréquemment atténuée par des figures instrumentales de type concertant. Peut-être ce nouveau trait de caractère, surgissant vers 1730 dans la musique de Bach, est-il l'une des raisons de la popularité dont jouit aujourd'hui l'oratorio.
Bach instrumenta chaque partie de l'œuvre de manière spécifique. De ce fait, l'auditeur voit chaque scène illustrée par une image sonore propre. Cela est particulièrement frappant dans l'ouverture purement instrumentale de la deuxième partie. Le musicologue et médecin Albert Schweitzer y voyait un échange musical entre les anges (cordes et flûtes traversières) et les bergers (hautbois). Instruments royaux des dix-septième et dix-huitième siècles, les trompettes et les timbales symbolisent, dans les première, troisième et sixième parties véritables piliers de l'œuvre la puissance du nouveau-né, fils de Dieu, apparu sur terre pour apporter aux hommes la rédemption et les réconcilier avec le Seigneur.

***
Après la mort de Bach, l'Oratorio de Noël devint propriété de son fils cadet Carl Philipp Emanuel, à Berlin. Celui-ci allait, dans les années à venir, utiliser le seul chœur initial «Jauchzet, frohlocket». Sans rien changer du texte, il reprit ce mouvement, dans une instrumentation légèrement modifiée, au début d'une œuvre pascale exécutée en 1778. Il n'y eut, apparamment aucune occasion de donner l'Oratorio de Noël à Hambourg.
À la différence des deux passions (Saint-Matthieu et Saint-Jean), de certaines cantates et des différentes messes, l'Oratorio de Noël ne fut plus exécuté après 1800, et ce pendant une durée relativement longue. La première exécution publique avérée eut lieu le 20 dédembre 1844, avec la Singakademie de Breslau placée sous la direction de son directeur Johann Theodor Mosewius. Encore faut-il préciser que ne furent données que les deux premières parties. D'autres interprétations suivirent en 1845, 1847 et 1848, toujours à Breslau. L'œuvre n'avait, à cette époque, toujours pas été imprimée. La première exécution de la Sing-Akademie de Berlin eut lieu len 1857, sous la direction d'Eduard Grell. Du fait de l'extrême difficulté technique qu'il représentait - en particulier pour les chanteurs -, l'oratorio fut transposé un demi-ton plus bas, en ré bémol majeur. Les très importantes coupures pratiquées à cette occasion étaient tout à fait habituelles pour l'époque. L'exécution intégrale de l'œuvre - que le directeur de la Sing-Akademie espérait pour l'avenir - n'aurait vraisemblablement pas suscité un intérêt débordant de la part du public, car l'enthousiasme des berlinois à l'égard de Bach était encore relativement limité. Il fallut attendre 1922 pour que l'Oratorio de Noël soit donné au Gewandhaus de Leipzig.
Sous la direction de son Directeur musical Carl Reinecke, l'Orchestre du Gewandhaus n'en avait donné que de courts extraits, tels la «symphonie des bergers» (1862 et 1870), le chœur initial «Jauchzet, frohlocket!» (1861) ou le choral «Wir singen dir in deinem Heer» (1862). Ce n'est que le 20 décembre 1923 que les trois premières parties y furent exécutées. La première exécution intégrale eut lieu les 13 et 14 décembre 1958.
La présente interprétation a été enregistrée live les 7 et 8 janvier 2010 au Gewandhaus de Leipzig. Elle s'inscrit dans un vaste cycle Bach, dirigé par le Gewandhauskapellmeister Riccardo Chailly, entamé en 2007 avec les six Concertos Brandebourgeois. En 2009, fut exécutée la Passion selon Saint-Matthieu, la saison 2010 étant consacrée aux concertos pour pianos (avec en soliste Ramin Bahrami) et à la Passion selon Saint-Jean. La Messe en si est, quant à elle, programmée pour 2014.

Andreas Glöckner
8/2010