KAVAKOS Virtuoso

LEONIDAS KAVAKOS
Virtuoso

Works by
Dvorák · de Falla
Paganini · Sarasate
Strauss · Stravinsky a.o.
Leonidas Kavakos
Enrico Pace
Int. Release 01 Apr. 2016
1 CD / Download
0289 478 9377 6


트랙리스트

Igor Stravinsky (1882 - 1971)
Petrouchka

2.
4:11

Pablo Martin De Sarasate (1844 - 1908)
Leonidas Kavakos, Enrico Pace

Francisco Tárrega (1852 - 1909)
Leonidas Kavakos

Manuel de Falla (1876 - 1946)
El sombrero de tres picos

Leonidas Kavakos, Enrico Pace

Niccolò Paganini (1782 - 1840)
Leonidas Kavakos

Henryk Wieniawski (1835 - 1880)
Richard Strauss (1864 - 1949)
Ernst von Dohnányi (1877 - 1960)
Ruralia Hungarica for violin and piano, Op.32c (1914)

Benjamin Britten (1913 - 1976)
11.
5:14

Edward Elgar (1857 - 1934)
Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840 - 1893)
Leonidas Kavakos, Enrico Pace

Niccolò Paganini (1782 - 1840)
Leonidas Kavakos

Antonín Dvorák (1841 - 1904)
Leonidas Kavakos, Enrico Pace

총 재생시간 1:18:46

. . . these rarely heard encores are just so well done in the hands of Greek violinist Leonidas Kavakos -- who brings them to life on his latest recording, "Virtuoso".

It's not just the enticing morceaux on offer and the undiluted pleasure of hearing a great violinist at the top of his game (musically and technically) . . . The first glimpse of Kavakos's fabulous agility comes at the end of Sarasate's "Caprice Basque" but is emphatically underlined a few tracks further on with Paganini's Introduction and Variations on "Nel cor più non mi sento" . . . This is playing that sorts out the men from the boys. I doubt if there is more than a handful of violinists alive who can match Kavakos in the tonal variety, accuracy and speed of his harmonics, or in the deft alternation of bowing and left-hand pizzicato . . . Elsewhere there is charm aplenty (Elgar's "La Capricieuse", Vása Prihoda's arrangement of the waltzes from "Der Rosenkavalier") and tender introspection (Tchaikovsky's "Valse sentimentale") . . . I can't remember when I last enjoyed a violin recital quite as much as this. And it's complemented by Tully Potter's genial booklet and an ideal recorded balance between the two artists.

These show-stopping virtuoso pieces push the violin (not to mention violinist) to the absolute limit, something the excellent soloist Leonidas Kavakos handles, and revels in, brilliantly.

These show-stopping virtuoso pieces push the violin (not to mention violinist) to the absolute limit, something the excellent soloist Leonidas Kavakos handles, and revels in, brilliantly.

. . . undiluted pleasure . . . a great violinist at the top of his game (musically and technically) . . . You are given the impression of eavesdropping on a pair of musicians having a real blast (Enrico Pace is the other -- a marvellously attentive but far from self-effacing accompanist) . . . The first glimpse of Kavakos's fabulous agility comes at the end of Sarasate's "Caprice Basque" but is emphatically underlined a few tracks further on with Paganini's Introduction and Variations on "Nel cor piu non mi sento" . . . This is playing that sorts out the men from the boys. I doubt if there is more than a handful of violinists alive who can match Kavakos in the tonal variety, accuracy and speed of his harmonics, or in the deft alternation of bowing and left-hand pizzicato. In fact, I wonder if Paganini would have equalled him. Then there is the perfect evenness of moto perpetuo semiquavers in "Recuerdos de la Alhambra"-- a remarkable feat at this speed . . . Elsewhere there is charm aplenty (Elgar's "La Capricieuse", Vasa Pihoda's arrangement of the waltzes from "Der Rosenkavalier") and tender introspection (Tchaikovsky's "Valse sentimentale") . . . I can't remember when I last enjoyed a violin recital quite as much as this. And it's complemented by Tully Potter's genial booklet and an ideal recorded balance between the two artists.

Kavakos' album is titled "Virtuoso", and it lives up to its billing . . . Kavakos demonstrates that he can play just about anything with near-perfect intonation and at top speed . . . Equally impressive in the more lyrical pieces, he plays in a style usually associated with great violinists of the past: the slides and hesitations in Dvorák's "Humoresque", Op. 101, No. 7, in the Kreisler arrangement, for example, or the gorgeous tone displayed in Sarasate's "Romanza Andaluza" . . . There is one near-contemporary gem in the collection: Benjamin Britten's "Reveille" . . . Kavakos' performance is superb. Over a deceptively simple accompaniment, with technical tricks fully integrated into the flow of the music, his violin weaves a hypnotic spell . . . This new Decca CD will certainly further enhance his reputation.

A huge variety of virtuoso fare is here -- from those that might be anticipated (such as Sarasate's Caprice basque, which receives a tidy and sculptured rendition with much colour, or Paganini's "Nel cor più non mi sento" Variations -- which soon settles into a dazzling display of violinistic pyrotechnics) to less obvious works, such as Ricci's transcription of Tárrega's "Recuerdos de la Alhambra" or Britten's "Reveille", which has a wonderful sense of space and psychological sophistication, balancing undeniable technical demands . . . These are exciting performances . . . the playing is first-rate, recorded with the clarity and balance you might expect of Decca.

Kavakos navigates these waters with consummate ease and musicality.

This is one of those discs which, from the very first second, makes you sit with open-mouthed admiration at the sheer brilliance of the playing . . . we are in the presence of an extraordinarily gifted player who is here indulging in an unabashed exhibition of his violinistic mastery . . . The two Stravinsky solos kick things off with real impact, the "Danse russe" fizzing with energy while the poise of "Chanson russe" adds a deeper dimension. Subtle bending of the rhythm and note give an instinctive Spanish feel to the Sarasate pieces . . . [with] a dazzling display of technical brilliance in the variations of the "Caprice basque" . . . [in Ricci's transcription of the "Recuerdos de la Alhambra"] Kavakos creates that guitarist finger-nail clarity of articulation in a performance which is not merely an aural exhibition, but rather more of a personal interpretation of the music . . . [similar elevation of the disc's violinist party-pieces] make these musically rewarding performances with real interpretative personality . . . Kavakos's ever-astute pianist, Enrico Pace, matches every gesture step-for-step . . . The 13-minute set of variations on a theme from Paisiello's "La molinara" is so full of Paganini conjuring tricks that one wonders, not for the first time, quite how so much of it is humanly possible. And as for the variations on "God Save the King" one does not know whether to laugh, cry, stand rigidly to attention or suggest high treason as the British national anthem is so pulled, pushed, squeezed and distorted into an exhibition of improbable violinistic feats.

The program affords scope for almost everything the instrument is capable of, while also demonstrating that Kavakos is seriously musical . . . [he effortlessly tosses off "Danse Russe"] with an impossibly difficult array of double-stops and harmonics . . . He has both beauty of tone and the quickness to insert nuances into the fastest passages . . . hearing Kavakos manage the simultaneous bowing and pizzicato in Sarasate's "Caprice Basque" will astonish. His ability to not break the lyrical line or lose the sweetness of his tone is beyond praise . . . ["Recuerdos de la Alhambra"] is a staggering display of spiccato playing in two gears at once: Kavakos bounces the bow at lightning speed while interrupting this swarm of bees with slower bounced notes for the melody. It's another impossible feat to my ears . . . Kavakos and his excellent accompanist, Enrico Pace, give nothing away to stylish predecessors . . . Kavakos clears the air of cloying heliotrope by virtue of his purity of tone and technique . . . I also appreciate the care he has gone to in finding unusual material and avoiding cliches of the genres. Decca's recorded sound is close but well-balanced with the piano . . . [an] exceptional solo recital . . .

Hier verschwindet einer [Leonidas Kavakos] komplett hinter seiner Kunst für eine schamlose Feier technischer Überlegenheit. Hier geht es wirklich nur um Virtuosität als reinen Selbstzweck . . . Das Besondere an dieser CD ist, dass es Kavakos gelingt, sich gleichzeitig als Musiker von tiefem Ausdruck zu zeigen (so es die Stücke denn überhaupt zulassen).

Das Besondere an dieser CD ist, dass es Kavakos gelingt, sich gleichzeitig als Musiker von tiefstem Ausdruck zu zeigen . . . Kavakos' Klavierpartner Enrico Pace ist einer der versiertesten Klavierbegleiter - wenn er denn mal zum Zuge kommt. Verblüffend ist der KLang der Aufnahme. Da wurde nicht auf Effekt mikrofoniert. So klingen manche Stücke nach ganz alter Schule und lassen an aAufnahmen von Oistrach und Heifetz denken.

. . . [Leonidas Kavakos] impose ici par son invention et un choix de répertoire particulièrement éclaire. Doté de moyens qui lui permettent une totale liberté expressive, il se joue des périls de l'écriture pour en extraire toute la saveur. Incisif et mordant dans la "Danse Russe" de "Petrouchka", le voici enjôleur dans la "Romance andalouse" de Sarasate. La clarté d'articulation impressionne dans "Recuerdos de la Alhambra" . . . Paganini, éternel emblème de la virtuosité, est représenté par deux de ses pages pour violon seul les plus exigeantes: "Nel cor piu non mi sento" et les "Variations sur God Save The King". Théâtral à souhait, Kavakos s'y révèle formidablement inspiré. Une prise de son d'une rare présence . . . Pizzicatos de main gauche, enchainement d'harmoniques, staccato volant, ricochets, doubles et triples cordes: aucune difficulté ne saurait entraver son discours . . . ["Capriccio-Valse" et "Andante alla zingaresca"] sont servis avec autant de goût que de panache, l'excellent Enrico Pace lui apportant une réplique qui dépasse de loin le simple accompagnement.