SERGEI RACHMANINOV Rarities Vladimir Ashkenazy

SERGEI RACHMANINOV

Rarities
Vladimir Ashkenazy
Int. Release 04 Feb. 2013
1 CD / Download
0289 478 2939 3
Vladimir Ashkenazy celebrates 50 years of Recording with “Rachmaninov Rarities” on Decca Classics


Liste de titres

Sergey Vasil'yevich Rachmaninov (1873 - 1943)
Morceaux de Salon, Op.10

2.
4:55

Morceaux de Salon, Op.10

3.
3:47

Morceaux de Salon, Op.10

4.
4:08

Morceaux de Salon, Op.10

5.
4:01

Morceaux de Salon, Op.10

6.
3:14

Morceaux de Salon, Op.10

7.
3:45

Morceaux de Salon, Op.10

8.
5:00

Three Nocturnes

9.
3:44

Three Nocturnes

Three Nocturnes

14.
2:43

Four Pieces (originally Op.1)

15.
2:28

Four Pieces (originally Op.1)

16.
2:56

Four Pieces (originally Op.1)

17.
3:38

Four Pieces (originally Op.1)

18.
3:42

19.
3:39

21.
1:18

22.
1:54

Vespers (All-Night Vigil), Op.37

Vladimir Ashkenazy

Durée totale de lecture 1:15:46

In the years since he burst onto the world’s stage at the 1955 Chopin Competition in Warsaw, Vladimir Ashkenazy has built an extraordinary career, not only as one of the most renowned and revered pianists of our times, but as an artist whose creative life encompasses a vast range of activities and continues to offer inspiration to music-lovers across the world. With a questing intellect and prodigious technique, the legendary pianist commands a spectacular repertoire, but he is perhaps most closely associated with the piano music of Sergei Rachmaninov. Now 75, Ashkenazy has been an exclusive Decca recording artist for 50 years; by way of marking this notable anniversary, he follows his acclaimed 2011 release of the composer’s First Sonata and Chopin Variations with Rachmaninov Rarities, a fascinating selection of rarely-performed, forgotten and unpublished works, including several world premiere recordings.

Rachmaninov – who crossed the border from Russia into Finland in December of 1917, never to return – occupies a special place in Ashkenazy’s discography; with this final release, Ashkenazy will have recorded all of the composer’s works for piano, along with a number of transcriptions. (His very first Decca recordings, made in 1963, included several of the Études-tableaux, op. 39, and the Piano Concerto no. 3 in D minor – with the London Symphony Orchestra and Fistoulari.) The new disc features the composer’s Morceaux de salon, op. 10 – probably the best-known works on the album; along with three Nocturnes written when the composer was just fourteen years of age. Ten shorter early works, including Ashkenazy’s own arrangement of an unpublished addition to the composer’s Songs without Words – “Noch’ pechal’na”, op. 26, no. 12 – complete the programme.

Perhaps the most poignant inclusion on the recording is the final track: a piano transcription of the Nunc dimittis from Rachmaninov’s All-Night Vigil<7em>, op. 37. Religion was officially censured in Russia when Rachmaninov wrote his magnificent choral setting of this Holy Week liturgy. The composer wished it to be sung at his funeral, “a feat presumably made impossible through lack of ‘Russian basses’ capable of the profound B flat at the end”.

Vladimir Ashkenazy writes: “I decided to include this movement from the Vespers as it reminds me of the occasion – I think it was in the early sixties – when word got around about a midnight performance in a Moscow church on Easter Holy Saturday. Most of the teachers and students of the Conservatory were there. For me – christened in an Orthodox church by my Russian mother, Evstolia Plotnova, daughter of Grigory Plotnov, chorus master of the Russian Orthodox Church in the province of Ivanovo – it was a very special occasion which will never be forgotten. I am grateful to destiny that I am able to finish the complete recording of Rachmaninov’s piano music, and I feel it is an appropriate close to the disc.”

Of Ashkenazy’s previous two Rachmaninov discs, The Guardian wrote, “An exceptional artist … Ashkenazy presents every piece immaculately” and The Daily Telegraph remarked, “Ashkenazy’s Rachmaninov recordings have long led the field.”