JANSEN Brahms & Bartók

JANINE JANSEN
Brahms & Bartók

BRAHMS:
Violin Concerto in D Major, op. 77

BARTÓK:
Violin Concerto No.1
Janine Jansen
Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia
London Symphony Orchestra
Antonio Pappano
Int. Release 06 Jan. 2016
1 CD / Download
0289 478 8412 5

. . . this remarkable coupling of two towering violin concertos finds Janine Jansen fully in command of two distinct musical languages . . . the quality that comes through in her playing -- and for that matter through the supple, passionate conducting of Antonio Pappano -- is the sheer personal force that each composer expressed through this music . . . [Brahms / Violin Concerto no. 1]: Pappano can elicit a singing tone from an orchestra, as he does here, while at the same time injecting it with power, grandeur, sensitivity and subtlety of instrumental timbre, the musicians responding with eloquent refinement and strength. Jansen is breathtakingly supreme. She possesses all the intellectual authority and expressive weight that the first movement requires, yet this is tempered by the wonderful spectrum of tone and the fluidity of pulse she can summon in the slow movement . . . [both Jansen and Pappano perform the finale] with terrific momentum and exuberant, spicy flourish. The stature of the Brahms concerto is impressively captured here . . . [just as the Bartók concerto] delves deeply and movingly into the music's piquant romantic sensibility and brings to the second movement a mercurial range of moods, a sophisticated palette of colour and a folk-tinged vitality. Altogether a highly desirable disc.

. . . the quality that comes through in her playing -- and for that matter through the supple, passionate conducting of Antonio Pappano -- is the sheer personal force that each composer expressed through this music . . . Pappano can elicit a singing tone from an orchestra, as he does here, while at the same time injecting it with power, grandeur, sensitivity and subtlety of instrumental timbre, the musicians responding with eloquent refinement . . . Jansen is breathtakingly supreme. She possesses all the intellectual authority and expressive weight . . . yet this is tempered by the wonderful spectrum of tone and the fluidity of pulse she can summon in the slow movement, blessed with some of the most beautiful, almost whispered notes high in the violin's register that you are ever likely to hear . . . [both Jansen and Pappano perform the Brahms concerto] with terrific momentum and exuberant, spicy flourish . . . the Brahms concerto is impressively captured here, just as the Bartók concerto . . . [also] delves deeply and movingly into the music's piquant romantic sensibility and brings to the second movement a mercurial range of moods, a sophisticated palette of colour and a folk-tinged vitality. Altogether a highly desirable disc.

Janine Jansen gives us a lyric reading of rare inwardness and beauty . . . [in the Bartók concerto this is heard in] the tenderness of her playing and the fineness with which she delineates solo lines . . . In fact, it is a performance that marries meditation with motion, such is the suppleness of Jansen's and Pappano's feel for the concerto's larger symphonic movement and the hand-in-glove relationship that exists between soloist, conductor and Pappano's superbly responsive Santa Cecilia orchestra . . . What's more, for all the ravishment of her playing, Jansen never threatens to hog the limelight . . . Jansen and Pappano continue their persuasive ways in the Adagio, which is lovingly realised at not too slow a tempo . . . Jansen's coupling is shrewd and imaginative . . . It's an inspired pairing. I find it remarkable that the Rome recording of the Brahms is live, so rapt is the atmosphere, so inch-perfect the recorded balances . . . Jansen's performance is a thing of quality in its own right which provides a strikingly original epilogue to an outstanding disc.

. . . [the Bartók concerto is] a wonderful showpiece for the lyrical and virtuosic Janine Jansen . . . Spellbinding from its opening solo, this is an imaginative pairing with a perfectly formed Brahms -- Jansen believes it is the first such coupling. Good idea, great playing.

. . . [Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia's and Pappano's sound in the Brahms Violin Concerto] is rich and weighty, the better to support Jansen's interpretation, itself heavyweight yet characteristically mercurial. Jansen's playing glows, and the second theme of the first movement really sings; here and throughout, there is the feeling that Jansen wants every phrase to say something. Refreshingly in this sometimes over-veneered work, she is not afraid to let the sound turn fleetingly vehement when needed . . . [Bartók 1]: There is no doubt of the sincerity of feeling in Jansen's performance, all tender lyricism and contained but palpable passion. It's balanced convincingly by the second, final movement, in which the playing is crisp and characterful from soloist and orchestra alike.

I don't think she has made a better recording than this . . . The Brahms is a perfect balance of the impulsive and the lyrical, showcasing Jansen's gorgeously silky sound on her 1727 Strad. What most caught my attention, however, was the delicious playfulness of the interpretation . . . [in Jansen's hands the Bartók sounds far closer to Brahms's romantic spirit than to the iconoclastic toughness for which Bartók was renowned . . . Jansen brilliantly responds to this bipolar element.

[Bartók 1]: Antonio Pappano's responsive LSO are suitably refined accompanists in Bartók's rapturous first movement. The closing minutes are sublime, especially when we're wrong-footed by an unexpected resolution. And the brief recollection of the 6/8 opening just before the finale's brash close is wonderfully handled, Jansen playing with serene assurance. Has this work ever received a better recording? . . . [Brahms / Violin Concerto]: a performance bristling with fiery intelligence. Pappano clarifies Brahms's thick textures, and the orchestra's quiet playing is among this reading's glories. The quiet passage immediately after the first movement cadenza is heartstopping, and the Adagio's oboe solo is very sweetly done. This concerto can feel a bit of a slog, but Jansen and Pappano's collective intelligence makes it fly by. Brahms's finale rightly dances, never going through the motions.

Janine Jansen's customary fire comes through, clear and blazing, in this unusual pairing of violin concertos . . . [in the Brahms concerto,] Ms. Jansen and Mr. Pappano let loose all their charisma and sonic clout. After an Adagio colored by exquisite wind solos, the last movement erupts in a jubilant, rustic dance . . . [in the Bartok, Ms. Jansen patiently spins the solo line,] which she fills out with emotion in tiny increments. In the mercurial second movement she eagerly responds to each mood swing in the music, turning in a standout performance of this masterful concerto.

. . . an unusual pairing that has not been tried on disc before, but it makes perfect sense . . . This is an inspired pairing. Jansen plays with a beautiful tone in the Brahms but just as much credit should be levelled at conductor Antonio Pappano and the Santa Cecilia orchestra, for their singing accompaniment that makes the listener want to hum along with the tunes . . . in this recording there is a fresh approach, as though the melodies have just been written. The oboe solo in the slow movement is gorgeously played, while the rustic finale is joyous and uninhibited. The Bartók is similarly fresh, and again the orchestra -- this time the London Symphony -- cut through all the different textures and crossrhythms to make sense of this occasionally complex music. The rhythmic profile is strong once again, while technically Jansen is right at the top of her game, graceful in the first movement and gritty in the second but without losing any poise . . . The two works complement each other in a highly original and brilliantly played pairing.

It's a long time since we heard a Brahms Concerto as freshly conceived and intensely played as this live performance . . . their rapport here is complete. She is daring with the improvisatory, rhapsodising quality of the solo passages in Brahms's great first movement, while the conductor encourages a chamber music-like affinity between the soloist and his outstanding principal oboe, Francesco di Rosa, in the sublime adagio. Moreover, the Hungarian finale is played with exhilarating dash and bravado . . . [Jansen is a zealous advocate for Bartók's first Violin Concerto,] which often sounds like a dry run for the later, greater concerto -- but not here!

. . . [Brahms / Violin Concerto]: a particularly beautiful and authoritative account. Tempi, a touch slower than some recent recordings, allow a reflective yet magisterial approach. Jansen's lyricism, refinement and obvious love for this music is matched by intensity and conviction. Joachim Brahms' lovely cadenza is fresh and radiant.

Bartók to rave about, recorded by a dream team . . .

Pappano sets the scene well at the beginning: elegant long lines and richness of sound combined with fluidity of movement . . . Jansen's performance seems to want to tell us that this is what the Brahms Violin Concerto is really about: not so much a symphony with violin as chamber music with orchestra . . . it works well. Brahms here is truly the German Romantic poet of woodland solitude . . . [the Bartók concerto] is a revelation. Somehow Jansen manages to coax this music out of its accustomed reticence, but without any sense of forcing it to speak. The music remains reserved, acutely sensitive, but now with an added dimension of almost painful tenderness . . . this concerto really does sing of unrequited love, well-aided by the warm and beautifully balanced recording.

A truly beautiful account of the Brahms, poised and utterly committed, with bewitching orchestral support . . .

. . . [Jansen's Brahms concerto is] a sweet-toned account. Kreisler-ish rather than Heifetz-ian and dynamically matched by Pappano's Rome orchestra -- never swamping the soloist . . . [while the Bartók concerto offers considerably more] in respect of tonal subtlety and ambient information.

. . . a richly rewarding new collaboration . . . [the rousing Brahms masterwork contrasts] beautifully with Bartok's lyrical and folk influenced creation . . .

[Brahms / Violin Concerto]: Ms. Jansen plays beautifully, as we would expect. There is always a lovely lilt to the music, the melodies floating effortlessly throughout. She is particularly careful not to overdo the main theme in the first movement but keeps it in accordance with the light, flowing mood of the rest of her playing. The "Adagio", with its beautiful oboe introduction, is the highlight of the show, with Jansen's entrance most magical. Then, Pappano and company end the work in a properly enthusiastic style . . . [in the Bartok, the LSO sounds fuller and lusher,] yet they still provide Ms. Jansen a relatively intimate accompaniment. Perhaps to better establish the relationship between the Bartok and Brahms pieces, Ms. Jansen injects them both with an affectionate, evocative flavor, the melodies dancing with a passionate, songlike character . . .

. . . this new release is worth having for the Brahms alone . . . [Jansen] delivers an engrossing interpretation of the first movement, filled with personal touches, subtlety, and an overall feeling of freshness. The accompaniment under an equally animated Antonio Pappano is also superior . . . The Brahms Violin Concerto is also brawny and symphonic in scope, especially in the opening movement, and for me it was the tonal grandeur of Jansen's playing that captured my attention -- she far exceeded expectations . . . [I'm not entirely captivated by Bartók's score,] but Jansen could make me a convert. She and Pappano deliver a Romantic reading of luscious languor in the first movement that's irresistible . . . [this pairing achieves] a striking success on all counts . . . [Jansen's Stradivarius] is recorded with sumptuous fidelity, as are both orchestras. The program notes are above average.

The Brahms is quite good. The Saint Cecilia forces have a dark and weighty sound that fits this music well . . . the slow movement is swiftly flowing and sings well. The woodwind solos are beautiful, and never drag. Janine Jansen is of course a great soloist . . . and she plays with tremendous personality and a real understanding of Brahms' moods . . . [in Bartók's Violin Concerto no. 1] the London Symphony sounds outstanding . . . Pappano clearly understands the sound world that the music requires to be successful. And Jansen makes this music even more her own than she does the Brahms . . . this is excellent.

. . . dazzlingly played.

The Brahms Violin Concerto is a challenging warhorse for any violinist to record, especially given the wealth of excellent recordings already in existence. Janine Jansen rises to the occasion here in a recording that is an interpretive masterclass. Her playing is strikingly beautiful with a shimmering brightness of tone and spotless intonation. She makes each phrase count as each note adds to the meaning and heft of the whole piece. The first movement is especially thoughtful, both commanding and graceful . . . The first movement of the Bartok is also a highlight of the disc, with Jansen shining in the lyric solo lines.

Jansen setzt in ihrer zackigen Interpretation klare Schwerpunkte, werkelt einzelne Stellen explizit heraus und muss nicht kämpfen, sondern wird umschmiegt von Genialität.

Ausgewogen und ausdrucksstark, aber auch mit viel Spannung und Witz speilt [sic] Jansen auf ihrer Baron Deurbroucq Stradivari. Pappano entlockt beiden Orchestern bei aller Wucht einen geradezu singenden Ton. Auch die Aufnahmequalität ist präzise gefangen. Das Ergebnis sind lebhafte Interpretationen zweier Violinkonzerte, die doch mehr gemeinsam haben, als an zunächst vermutet hätte.

Ausgewogen und ausdrucksstark, aber auch mit viel Spannung und Witz spielt Jansen auf ihrer Baron Deurbroucq Stradivari. Pappano entlockt beiden Orchestern bei aller Wucht einen geradezu singenden Ton. Auch die Aufnahmequalität überzeugt durch luziden Klang, die Dynamik ist präzise eingefangen. Das Ergebnis sind lebhafte Interpretationen zweier Violinkonzerte, die doch mehr gemeinsam haben, als man zunächst vermutet hätte.

Jansen zeigt die verletzliche, fragile Seite dieser Musik, ihr Spiel kann sie bis zur bewussten Ausdruckslosigkeit reduzieren, was die Eindringlichkeit letztlich steigert.

Die geerdete Schönheit, das fließende Legato und die in allen Farben funkelnde Feinstoffigkeit ihres Spiels wirken so natürlich-charismatisch, so erzählerisch-plausibel, so tiefempfunden mittig, dass man nach wenigen Takten ihrem Zauber erliegt.

Jede Nuance, jede Phrase, überhaupt jeder Gedanke wird hier wie da kammermusikalisch fein und trotzdem mit ganz großem klangraumerfüllenden Atem ausmusiziert.

[Brahms / Violin Concerto]: Wie kaum jemand zuvor machen die niederländische Geigerin Janine Jansen und Antonio Pappano am Pult dessen lyrische Qualitäten deutlich. Sie schwelgen geradezu in verinnerlichten, leisen Tönen und tauchen die Klänge dadurch in ein geheimnisvolles Licht . . . Exzellent auch Bartóks 1. Violinkonzert . . .

Jede Aufnahme wird zum Meilenstein, man MUSS das hören: jeder Geiger sollte Jansens Sachen hören. Ihr Ton ist immer umarmend schön, tatsächlich spricht die Stradivari, die sie gegenwärtig spielt, fantastisch auf Jansens Technik an . . . Die CD ist toll, Jansen in Höchstform.

Gleich der Beginn bei Bartóks Violinkonzert Nr. 1 nimmt gefangen: Ein Geigenklang schwebt wie ein Hauch auf die Erde, bis er volle Gestalt annimmt und filigran, betörend, sinnlich, expressiv, magisch seine Kreise zieht . . . Janine Jansen im Solopart setzt hier Maßstäbe.

Technisch perfekt und musikalisch in jeder Hinsicht anrührend. Attribute, die auch auf ihre Interpretation des bekannten Brahms-Opus zutreffen. Auch hier dominiert der lyrische, blühende Duktus, für den sie ihre Stradivari Klänge von entrückter Schönheit entlockt, ohne sich in Schönheit zu verlieren. Eine Brahms-Interpretation von besonders sensiblem Feingefühl, in der sich Pappano der Werksicht der Solistin nahtlos anpasst. In der Kopplung mit der kongenialen Darstellung des frühen Bartók-Werks ein derzeit konkurrenzloses Angebot.

Eine bisher einmalige Zusammenstellung . . . In der Kooperation mit dem schon lange künstlerisch eng mit ihr verbundenen Dirigenten Antonio Pappano spürt man die innige, intensive Ausdruckskraft des Werks in jedem Takt . . . Technisch perfekt und musikalisch in jeder Hinsicht anrührend . . . Eine Brahms-Interpretation
von besonders sensiblem Feingefühl, in der sich Pappano der Werksicht der Solistin nahtlos anpasst. In der Kopplung mit der kongenialen Darstellung des frühen Bartók-Werks ein derzeit konkurrenzloses Angebot.

Erstklassisch.

. . . dieses Wechselspiel von Ausdruckskraft und feingesponnenem Lyrismus prägt auch die lupenreine Interpretation der 38-Jährigen, die sich in den letzten zehn Jahren in die absolute Weltspitze vorgearbeitet hat . . . die geerdete Schönheit, das fließende Legato und die in allen Farben funkelnde Feinstofflichkeit ihres Spiels verzaubern auf Anhieb, verströmen Natürlichkeit und erzählerische Kraft.

In beiden Werken sieht sie den emotionalen Gehalt in zärtlichen Liebeserklärungen, von denen sie Bartóks Widmung an die von ihm verehrte Geigerin Steffi Geyer besonders berührt hat.

In der Kooperation mit dem schon lange künstlerisch eng mit ihr verbundenen
Dirigenten Antonio Pappano spürt man die innige, intensive Ausdruckskraft des Werks in jedem Takt. Mit berückend weichem, differenziertem Ton ohne jede Larmoyanz im ersten Satz, mit vitalem tänzerischen Duktus im zweiten und letzten Satz.

. . . [eine] lupenreine, ungemein sinnliche Interpretation . . . [dass Jansen] das Brahmskonzert hier in einem aktuellen Konzertmitschnitt vorstellt, unterstreicht eindrucksvoll ihre mittlerweile erworbene Souveränität und einen wirklich beeindruckenden Perfektionsgrad, der sich hier im Zusammenspiel mit dem opernerfahrenen Antonio Pappano und seinen römischen Musikern als ideale Synthese zwischen lebendiger Suggestivität und bestechender Präzision ausweist. Die geerdete Schönheit, das fliessende Legato, und die in allen Farben funkelnde Feinstofflichkeit ihres Spiels wirken so natürlich-charismatisch, so erzählerisch plausibel, so tiefempfunden mittig, dass man sich ihr gefahrlos anvertrauen kann . . . [in der Bartók-Konzert] entfaltet sie immense lyrische Intensität und eine fast melancholische Zärtlichkeit, und hebt so auch dieses noch immer kaum gespielte Juwel in den Rang eines Meisterwerks.

. . . Janine Jansen a des atouts ŕ faire valoir: rondeur et puissance de la sonorité (un Stradivarius), raffinement élégant des phrasés, et une entente manifestement parfaite avec le chef, Antonio Pappano. Et les couleurs d'un orchestre romain (Santa Cecilia) enrichissent joliment cette rencontre de la Hollandaise avec le concerto allemand . . . La sensualité de l'interprétation est un autre point commun ici.

. . . [le] lien trčs fort que relčve la soliste tient en la radieuse tonalité en ré majeur, celle de la joie et de l'amour, qui baigne les deux pičces. Restait ŕ laisser parler le stradivarius de la star néerlandaise, qui réduit le grand écart entre Brahms et Bartok avec une aisance désarmante . . . [quant ŕ Bartok,] ce disque offre une belle occasion de redécouvrir son concerto pour violon no 1 . . . Ce qu'elle démontre avec son brio habituel. Il est vrai qu'elle peut compter sur la complicité d'un autre immense musicien, Sir Antonio Pappano, ŕ la tęte du London Symphony et de l'Academia Santa Cecilia. Fougue et intériorité, vitalité et retenue: le dialogue entre la soliste et les troupes se fraie un chemin entre passions et émotions pour amener Brahms et Bartok ŕ leur point d'incandescence. La démonstration est flamboyante.

En une seule phrase, celle de son entrée aprčs le tutti introductif du concerto de Brahms, Janine Jansen promet un voyage exaltant . . . Au-delŕ d'une maîtrise instrumentale princičre, et des timbres célestes d'un précieux Stradivarius de 1727 qu'elle exploite dans toutes les tessitures et toutes les nuances, la soliste habite chaque ligne d'un mélange de verve et de grâce qui fait parler le moindre détail. Aucune surenchčre narcissique, mais la beauté ŕ l'état pur et ce juste brin de liberté qui donne tout leur sens aux intentions intimes de l'auteur. La cadence (de Joachim) est prodigieuse, taillée pour elle comme une robe sur mesure, si subtile qu'on en regretterait presque qu'elle ne dure pas plus longtemps . . . Janine Jansen s'y montre lŕ encore envoűtante, trouvant dans la ferveur et la poésie troublée de cette page un terrain tout aussi propice ŕ l'expression de son tempérament et de son art. Splendide.

. . . ardent et voluptueux . . . deux interprétations pleines de lyrisme du "Concerto" de Brahms et du "1er Concerto" de Bartók. Des lectures ni trop chargées ni trop superficielles . . . Janine Jansen: son magnétisme, son archet radieux . . . son archet dégage un mélange de volupté et d'ardeur qui siéent particuličrement bien au Concerto de Brahms et au 1er Concerto de Bartók . . . elle navigue au flux et reflux des vagues brahmsiennes. On savoure les courbes sensuelles comme les pics hérissés. Antonio Pappano et l'Orchestre de l'Académie nationale Sainte-Cécile de Rome lui prodiguent un accompagnement robuste et chaleureux . . . [Bartók 1]: Antonio Pappano (ŕ la tęte du London Symphony Orchestra) est sensible ŕ la dimension narrative de l'oeuvre. A la poésie du premier mouvement succčde un "Allegro giocoso" plein de vivacité et d'ironie. A nouveau, on est emporté par l'archet ŕ la fois fougueux et ferme de la violoniste. On y apprécie le dialogue avec l'orchestre plein de subtiles couleurs. Un régal.


Tracklist

      1. Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897)
        Violin Concerto In D, Op.77
        1. 1.
          1. Allegro non troppo
          22:08
        2. 2.
          2. Adagio
          8:28
        3. 3.
          3. Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace - Poco piů presto
          7:55
          Janine Jansen, Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, Antonio Pappano
      2. Béla Bartók (1881 - 1945)
        Violin Concerto No.1, BB 48a (Op.posth), Sz36
        1. 4.
          1. Andante sostenuto
          8:40
        2. 5.
          2. Allegro giocoso
          11:46
          Janine Jansen, London Symphony Orchestra, Antonio Pappano
    Playing Time 00:58:57